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Skill-Building: Extraction

Guidelines, articles and resources on the topic of extraction.

February 04, 2013
Category: in Skill-Building: Extraction
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Originally invented in 1941, the Chemex is a classic in the world of brewing devices.  With its hourglass shape and classy wood collar and tie, it’s simple and attractive.  It’s also all-American, made by a family-owned business in western Massachusetts.   But does handsome and timeless translate into a good brew?  I decided to check it out using our Chemex guide. The Process Fill your kettle three-quarters full with boiling water. Weigh and grind the coffee: I used 16 grams for 8 oz. of water and ground it on the “drip setting” Set up and rinse the filter:  One of the most unique parts about the Chemex is the extra-thick filters.  This allows the water to flow through slowly, making it hard...
Tagged in: brewing
The Taste of Paper Filters Here at Crop to Cup Brooklyn we were so bummed that we couldn't attend MANE Conference 2012, we decided to hold our own!  To do that we kicked out our cafe customers for the day (sorry) and held our own internal staff training,  quality competitions (barista Maya B. won all), tastings, lectures, etc.  For some unknown reason Dan decided to call the event Timecop 2012, even finding a photo of me (Taylor) giving a look similar to Jean Claude Van-Damme on the '94 hit's VHS sleeve.  Coincidentally, my "name" in high school French class was Jean-Claude for a year. Anyway, what I wanted to post about was our PAPER TASTING.   No coffee, just paper and water.  It's a good test to...
Think of an Italian café. The waiter brings you a small, white, porcelain cup stained by a rich espresso crema. You sip it and - smack - it hits you, right on the roof of your mouth. Bitterness. It overrides the subtleties of the shot and leaves an aftertaste not worth remembering. Yet bitterness is an often desirable aspect of the drink. Did you know that there are two different types of coffee beans? Arabica, which is generally smooth and clean, and Robusta, which can have a more bitter mouthfeel. Robusta is often added to espresso blends to help form a nice crema, or frothy head, to the espresso. It also lends its potent bitterness, which helps many espressos to stand...
Tagged in: bitter coffee espresso

June 08, 2009
Category: in Skill-Building: Extraction
Coffee Tip of the Week: How ground is too ground? Coffee Grinding Guide, and Mastering the Blade Grinder Although we recommend a conical burr grinder over a whirly-blade grinder because of the burrs' ability to produce a much more consistent grind, know that blade grinders are usually less expensive and can still produce a quality grind if you follow a few simple tricks. For all types of grinds (coarse, medium, fine, etc), if using a blade grinder, we recommend grinding in short bursts of about 2 to 3 seconds each. Holding the lid firmly in place, shake the grinder a few times during the process to make sure beans grind evenly. The Course Grind is intended for use with press pots,...
Did you dig the Coffee Roasting tips in our bi-weekly newsletter "How to get the Best Brew for your Bean"? Well, here are the additional tips we promised! 1.      Get good beans, the coffee can only be as good as the beans that go into it. Don't settle for bargain brands - your stomach will thank you. 2.      Use cold, filtered water (any type of consumer-level filter is great). If you don't filter it, at least use clean water; coffee is only as good as the water you use. Do not use distilled water - only filtered, bottled, or spring water. 3.      Remove the used coffee and the filter immediately after brewing; if not, then the filter will continue to drip...
Tagged in: beans coffee crop to cup
1. For a stronger, more full flavor, open the top of your drip machine and give the grounds a good stir. This will help release the full body of the roast. 2. If you use paper filters, wet the filter slightly before adding the grounds. This will help to make sure that the water flows through the entire filter easily, covering all the coffee grounds. 3. Get good beans, the coffee can only be as good as the beans that go into it. Don't settle for bargain brands - your stomach will thank you. 4. Use cold, filtered water (any type of consumer-level filter is great). If you don't filter it, at least use clean water; coffee is only as good...