0

Cart

A trader will contact you with shipping and payment options after checkout. Please note: free samples are provided to commercial roasting businesses only.

Cart subtotal:$0.00
Your cart is empty

Mexico 2013

Zijuatanejo, Mexico. Coastal Coffee.

(excerpt – full story available here)

When people think of coffee from Mexico, they think of Veracruz, Chiapas, Oaxaca, or Puebla. They rarely think of Guerrero, and they do not think of Zihuatanejo, a town along Mexico’s Costa Grande. The farms in Zihuatanejo that we visited are expansive with 26 members covering 400 hectares and 533,000 trees (~1,300 trees/hectare). These farms average 4300-5000 ft above sea-level and are beautiful, “kissed by the ocean’s salty breath,” in the words of farmer Maria Guadalupe Gomez-Anzo. Most coffee from this region has traditionally gone to middlemen who pay little attention to quality, but farmers are well-versed on good agronomic practices. Farmers here roast, cup, and drink their own coffee. Ceasar Galeana Sortiz was the first to produce coffee in Zijuatanejo, and since he has passed on the coffee growth to two generations below him. These farmers have taken an array of environmental initiatives from locating the proper organic inputs for their coffee, to cataloging local flora, attending regional seminars on environmental management, and preparing for a business to bring eco-tourism to the area.

Despite the careful techniques of the farmers, trees yield a lower-than-average 1-1.5KG cherry per tree that are often sold into markets at under 20 pesos/kilo. One of the biggest roadblocks we faced when we began our relationship with farmers here in Lleyva Mancilla was figuring out how to export the coffee. Farmers were not selling to an exporter through which Crop to Cup could ship out their coffee. Rather, all of the farmers sold their beans to large-scale middlemen who would then sell it to other trading and roasting operations in Mexico. In response to this, we worked with the farmers to build their own export operation with the assistance of AMECAFE in Mexico City. In September 2013, the farmers and newly minted exporter Grupo de Trabajo Llevya Mancilla successfully processed, bagged, and shipped beans to our warehouse in New Jersey.

Coffee Farming and Processing

On many farms, farmers build a box around each tree to preserve topsoil, and layer shade trees around to allow a good breeze to reach the evenly-spaced, well cared-for plants. The farmers have built drying tents, and the coffee trees are 80% bourbon or typical, and the rest are a smattering of yellow caturra and garnica.

Coffee Farming and Processing

On many farms, farmers build a box around each tree to preserve topsoil, and layer shade trees around to allow a good breeze to reach the evenly-spaced, well cared-for plants. The farmers have built drying tents, and the coffee trees are 80% bourbon or typical, and the rest are a smattering of yellow caturra and garnica.